Running Themselves Into the Ground? Incidence, Prevalence, and Impact of Injury and Illness in Runners Preparing for a Half or Full Marathon (JOSPT June 2019)

Reading current running research is important to our clinical team at Physiohaus. When patients embark on a training program, knowing that there will be "bumps in the road" while they train allows us to prepare for injuries or training deviations to occur. At Physiohaus, we will always address acute injuries with attention. Our administrative team asks each patient about their injury and speaks with the clinician treating them. We've been known to stay after work, work through our lunch, or open up the Runlab as needed for our acutely injured runners who have a race that they are training for.

Reading this current paper from JOSPT is helpful. Here are the stats on injuries and illness during training for a half or full marathon.

Nine in every 10 runners reported a running related injury or illness symptom during the 16-week period in the lead-up to a half marathon or full marathon. 1 in every 3 runners reported a running related injury. In any 2-week period, up to 1 in 7 runners reported a new running related injury. The most prevalent running related injuries affected the lower leg and knee. Ankle and substantial groin running related injuries had the greatest impact.


Running-related injuries occurred frequently in half and full marathon runners during a 16-week period in the lead-up to an event. In any 2-week period, up to 15% reported a new running related injury. The 2-week prevalence of running related injuries ranged from 29.2% to 43.5%

Are you training for a half or full maration? What does this new research mean?

Lower extremity running related injuries and illness symptoms occur frequently in runners preparing for a half or full marathon event and have an impact on running performance and participation. Future studies must clarify the etiology of these RRIs and identify measures that might help to decrease injury prevalence and impact.

Of important note: The findings are specific to half and full marathon runners. Therefore, they may not reflect running related injury and illness symptom epidemiology in other athletic populations.